The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners

The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners

Montgomery Best In Show Winners 2012 – LAKELAND TERRIER

GCH Iron Van Foliny Home

Breeders: Rony De Munter & Dieny Uiterwijk

The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners

1. The Montgomery County Kennel Club dog show is widely considered to be a breeder’s showcase. What does it mean to have bred a Best in Show winner at “The Greatest Terrier Show?” We are very proud breeders of “Aston,” GCH Iron Van Foliny Home, and consider this BIS as one of the big highlights in our breeding program.

2. How did you react when you realized that one of your dogs was awarded Best in Show at Montgomery? Were you there? We were thrilled to hear that Aston won BIS at Montgomery, as it is one of our favorite shows. Unfortunately, we were unable to go that year due to circumstances.

In the morning, we received a message saying, “Congratulations with your BIS at Montgomery.” We were highly delighted that one of our bred dogs won the Best Terrier Show in the World.

3. Can you tell us a bit about your winning Terrier? Aston was staying in our home most of the time before he went to Gabriel Rangel. He has always been a fantastic dog with a great character. He loved to show and he loved going to the dog show. He has a lovely breed type and, in our opinion, is a typical Lakeland Terrier.

4. Every purebred dog is the result of a series of breeding decisions. Can you share a bit about your dog’s pedigree as well as his/her impact on the breed? Aston is bred out of champions, going back to very old English bloodlines and well-bred champions. His mother was a bitch that was bred by us; her name was CH Burned Rose Van Foliny Home. “Rose” was a European and UK champion. The father was a well-known dog in the UK, CH Nujax My Way, a dog we liked a lot and of super breed type.

5. The future of some Terrier breeds appears to be uncertain. Do you have any advice to offer today’s breeders whose efforts are helping to preserve breeds that may be vulnerable to extinction? We think it’s very important that the promotion of the Terrier breeds is taken care of, as [theirs is] a heritage that has to be watched, and the importance of these breeds [has to be] realized.

We think breed clubs, breeders, handlers, and owners have some responsibility in promoting the Terrier breeds. People have to realize that a Terrier is an overall healthy breed with a fantastic temperament, and that the cross-breeds that are very popular over the whole world are not proven to be healthier and sounder in temperament.

Hoping the legacy of Terriers is going to be taken care of for many years to come.

Montgomery Best In Show Winners 2013 – wire fox terrier

GCH Afterall Painting The Sky

Breeders: A. J. Pertuit Jr. & Betty Seaton

The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners

The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners

1. The Montgomery County Kennel Club dog show is widely considered to be a breeder’s showcase. What does it mean to have bred a Best in Show winner at “The Greatest Terrier Show?” It makes me feel like I am on the right track to producing very nice Wires. No dog is perfect, and a perfect dog will never be bred. Yet, we can continue to pursue that goal.

2. How did you react when you realized that one of your dogs was awarded Best in Show at Montgomery? Were you there? Yes, I was there. I simply flipped out, as I did when Sky won BIS3 at the World Show in Paris (28,000 dogs entered).

3. Can you tell us a bit about your winning Terrier? What made this dog so special? Sky loves Gabriel—never takes her eyes off of him. This makes her presentation super and natural.

4. Every purebred dog is the result of a series of breeding decisions. Can you share a bit about your dog’s pedigree as well as his/her impact on the breed? Everything seems to come together with Sky, etc. She reminds me of Paddy, the Blackdale dog I imported, and Looy, the dog I imported from France with the head of Wyrequest Wires, some of which are in her pedigree.

5. The future of some Terrier breeds appears to be uncertain. Do you have any advice to offer today’s breeders whose efforts are helping to preserve breeds that may be vulnerable to extinction? Breeders need to persevere. Also, many breed clubs need to “wake up” and address the need to recruit/retain members. I see a definite lack of attention.

Montgomery Best In Show Winners 2018 – WELSH TERRIER

GCHS Abbeyrose
Captain Jack

Breeders: Mary Duafala, Pam Allen
& Judith Anspach

The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners
This is our favorite photo of Jack and his “family.” It shows GCHS Abbeyrose Captain Jack, his breeder-owners, his handler, Leonardo Garcini (and his team), and Jack’s friends and supporters from around the world. To us, this photo shows the true spirit of sportsmanship and camaraderie that will help to preserve our Terrier breeds.

1. The Montgomery County Kennel Club dog show is widely considered to be a breeder’s showcase. What does it mean to have bred a Best in Show winner at “The Greatest Terrier Show?” Words can’t describe the pride felt in winning BIS at the Greatest Terrier Show on Earth—pride in the dog we bred and pride in our handler for his exquisite conditioning and presentation of this wonderful dog.

2. How did you react when you realized that one of your dogs was awarded Best in Show at Montgomery? Were you there? All three of Jack’s breeder-owners were sitting ringside. While this was a dream that we all shared, it was always a dream that it would happen “one day.” We just did not expect that that would be the day! We were stunned, shocked, and happy beyond measure. This was the first time in 22 years that a Welsh Terrier had been awarded BIS at Montgomery. Making it even more special was being surrounded by friends and supporters from around the world who shed tears of joy along with us.

3. Can you tell us a bit about your winning Terrier? What made this dog so special? Captain Jack exudes Welsh Terrier type; he is sturdy, compact and rugged. When you see him in profile, there is no doubt that he is a Welsh Terrier. He is happy, playful, and dedicated too and, without fail, he demonstrated those characteristics every time he was in the ring. However, Captain Jack could never have achieved this level of success without his handler, Leonardo Garcini. As a team, Leo and Jack were flawless and never held back.

4. Every purebred dog is the result of a series of breeding decisions. Can you share a bit about your dog’s pedigree as well as his/her impact on the breed? Breeding decisions are so very important, and every breeding is planned out well in advance. We rely heavily on the coefficient of inbreeding in making breeding decisions, and focus on breed type. Jack has many wonderful Welsh of exemplary breed type behind him. He is by GCh. Brightluck Cheshire Gold Doubloon out of Ch. Abbeyrose A Penny for Your Thoughts. He has behind him our wonderful GCh. Abbeyrose Jersey Boy who, along with Ch. Abbeyrose Black-Eyed Susan, produced some of our most notable Welsh. There have been numerous landmarks in our breeding program, including the acquisition of Ch.
Abbeyrose Angel of Hapitails from our friends, Elizabeth Leaman and Richard Powell, who brought in the best attributes of the Hapitails program; breeding to Multi. Ch. See’s Ready to Go, owned by our friends, Peter and Jill See; and breeding to GCh. Marydale’s Limited Edition whom we leased from Mary Beecher. These are just a few of the Welsh who have been important to our program. Each of these dogs exuded breed type, and thankfully, passed it along to their offspring.

Jack wasn’t yet 2½ years old when he won BIS at Montgomery. To date, he has sired just a handful of litters, with numerous, wonderful Welsh that are gaining notoriety around the world. His true mark on the Welsh Terrier breed will be seen in years to come.

5. The future of some Terrier breeds appears to be uncertain. Do you have any advice to offer today’s breeders whose efforts are helping to preserve breeds that may be vulnerable to extinction? It is so very important to build alliances with other purebred dog enthusiasts, and work together as colleagues with a common goal. We should encourage and support other exhibitors, especially newcomers. We can expand our reach by participating in a wider range of events (performance and conformation) and programs. Co-ownerships of dogs with newcomers and with established breeders is a great way to expand involvement and build relationships. For example, Captain Jack was co-owned with Welsh Terrier breeder Janice Simmons, who brought her unique talents and interests to
the team.

Regional breed clubs can also expand our reach, and increase awareness of issues, while feeding membership to the National Club. At Abbeyrose, we believe education is an important strategy for building community, encouraging active participation, and preserving our breed. We are particularly committed to education about breed type, event opportunities, legislative issues, basic dog care, and tips, training, and health care issues, including alternative treatment options.

BIOS

Mary Duafala has been breeding Welsh Terriers under the prefix Abbeyrose for over 30 years. She has bred and owned nearly 50 AKC title holders (primarily Welsh Terriers, but also Wire Fox Terriers) and numerous Terrier Group winners and BIS winners, including GCHS Abbeyrose Captain Jack, 2018 MCKC BIS recipient. Mary was President of AlphaMED, Inc. Medical Communications, and is currently Executive Director of the Abbeyrose Foundation and owner of AlphaMED Bioenergetics, LLC where she focuses on moving wellness forward for people and their pets. She resides in Columbus, Ohio.

Judith Anspach has been a Welsh Terrier breeder for more than 30 years, joining Abbeyrose in 2009. She has bred and owned numerous AKC title holders in conformation and performance, including multiple BIS and BISS winner GCHS Abbeyrose Black Diamond, multiple RBIS and Group winner GCHS Abbeyrose Captain Morgan, and Ch Merrylegs Great Expections RAE CCX WTCA Versatility Champion Supreme. She has served as WTCA Recording Secretary and as a Board Member. After a career in legal education at various law schools, she retired from Indiana University Robert H McKinney School of Law where she taught Animal Law and Advanced Legal Research and was the Director of the Law Library. She lives in Carmel, Indiana.

Pam Allen has bred Welsh Terriers for 28 years and is part of the original Abbeyrose Welsh Terriers team. She has partnered with Mary Duafala in breeding both Welsh and Wire Fox Terriers, and both of them are AKC Silver Breeders of Merit. She is a Registered Pharmacist, a past President of the New Jersey Board of Pharmacy, and a retired healthcare executive having worked in Ohio, North Carolina, and New Jersey. Pam is the current editor of the WTCA WAG newsletter and lives in Columbus, Ohio.

Montgomery Best In Show Winners 2019 – WELSH TERRIER

GCHG Brightluck
Money Talks

Breeder: Janet McBrien

The Breeders Of Montgomery Best In Show Winners

1. The Montgomery County Kennel Club dog show is widely considered to be a breeder’s showcase. What does it mean to have bred a Best in Show winner at “The Greatest Terrier Show?” It is a thrill and a great honor to have bred a Montgomery BIS Winner. As a Welsh Terrier breeder, it is always a goal to show and win at the prestigious Montgomery Terrier Show, and to have won BIS left me giddy and awestruck as it is the greatest Terrier show in the world.

2. How did you react when you realized that one of your dogs was awarded Best in Show at Montgomery? Were you there? I was sitting ringside in the drizzling rain that day. When the judge pointed to my boy, who was beautifully presented by Tracy Szaras, my heart just swelled with pride and joy. I really thought he showed terrifically well, but I really doubted if a Welsh Terrier would win that year since a Welsh had won the previous year and there were so many wonderful Terriers presented that day.

3. Can you tell us a bit about your winning Terrier? What made this dog so special? GCHG Brightluck Money Talks (Dazzle) was special since he was an 8-week-old puppy. He was full of personality with a good temperament. He was a terrific, sound mover and was so square. As he grew up, he simply maintained all of those characteristics. At 10 weeks, he could stack, sit, down, come, target to hand, and do spin circles in both directions. He went to three different series of training and socialization classes, and when he was finished, he could do a thirty minute down-stay as well as many other skills. He would happily practice that in the middle of the kitchen floor while I was fixing dinner. My friend, Carolyn Campbell, is responsible for grooming him and getting him show savvy, and finishing his original championship. Keith Bailey, whom I’ve been friends with for over 20 years, asked to co-own with me and put him with her handler, Tracy Szaras, to see what he could do—and the rest is history. Many, many judges saw in him the same qualities that we felt made him spectacular. To have a dog finish as the #1 Welsh Terrier and the #1 Terrier, for two years in a row, still has me in awe of the great teamwork done by “Team Dazzle” with my boy. They made sure he was presented at his full potential.
Dazzle is happily home with me now after his spectacular career, and I can say that after about three days of readjustment, running in the yard and sitting in my lap, he remembered absolutely everything he did as a puppy.

4. Every purebred dog is the result of a series of breeding decisions. Can you share a bit about your dog’s pedigree as well as his/her impact on the breed? I had a background in horses for twenty years before I switched to dogs. I had a Welsh Terrier as a teen, and then again after I got out of horses.

In my Welsh breeding program, I’ve been able to keep two somewhat different pedigree lines going. Like most breeders, I did a litter, maybe, once every 12-15 months and kept the show quality pup for me to show to its championship. As I look back now, I realize that the best I was keeping and showing probably wasn’t necessarily up to top-quality breed standards. It took me, probably, 10 more years before I really started to have very competitive Welsh. I was able to keep my lines going with an occasional male outcross breeding. That outcross dog went back in pedigree to some of my early lines, and I would always choose the dog I thought would best physically compliment the girl I was breeding. Those few outcross breedings really strengthened and complimented my line.
Welsh of my breeding have influenced quite a few other Welsh breeders’ lines. I expect the same will be true of Dazzle’s influence on the breed, as his type, size, temperament, and quality will favorably influence other lines that other breeders have worked so hard to establish.

5. The future of some Terrier breeds appears to be uncertain. Do you have any advice to offer today’s breeders whose efforts are helping to preserve breeds that may be vulnerable to extinction? Breeding dogs is not for the faint of heart. Don’t be kennel blind about your own dogs’ weaknesses. I’ve found that being my own worst critic about my dogs has kept me improving my lines.
Be vigilant about health clearances, breed type, temperament, and compatible pedigrees. It’s not about breeding to the most popular winning dog, it’s about enhancing your girl’s qualities so that your next generation of Welsh will be better in some way than the last.
Our breed of wonderful Welsh Terriers is a preservation breed. Please don’t hesitate to freely share your hard-earned knowledge with other Welsh people, and try to mentor someone who is trying to get started in Welsh.

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  • The Montgomery Kennel Club was formed in 1956 and is a non-profit organized kennel club sanctioned by the American Kennel Club following the rules and regulations of the AKC.

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