Group Judges Share Thoughts on 2021 Westminster Kennel Club

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group Judges

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is an all-breed conformation show that was hosted in New York City from 1877 to 2020. For 2021, the event moved to Lyndhurst in Tarrytown, New York and was held outdoors due to the pandemic. This is the interview of the group judges.

James Covey

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group Judges1. The past year has been unlike anything the (dog show) world has experienced. How did you spend your time preparing for this year’s assignment?

Since I was a last-minute fill-in, there wasn’t much time for preparation (nervous anticipation). We checked our tuxedos to make sure they still fit, and upon advice of two dear friends in North Carolina, double-checked our shoes for comfort and stability. Aside from that, I refreshed myself on standards; especially for the new and rare breeds, since I’ve not judged at all in over 18 months.

2. The show was not held in New York City for the first time in the club’s 145-year history. What are your thoughts about the Lyndhurst location?

The Lyndhurst location was idyllic. And as much as we all enjoyed being there and wish it could be a yearly event, this is likely not feasible because of the weather in the Hudson Valley that time of year, and the cost and effort that went into preparation for the event.

3. Since the Groups were not judged at Madison Square Garden this year, did the night “feel” different to you in any way? 

Yes, different, but in no way diminished. This was a once-in-a-lifetime event, and I was proud to be a small part of it.

4. What about the lack of spectators; did you miss the raucous New York crowd?

Having never judged a Group at Westminster before, I have nothing to compare it to. But I think, for the most part, when a judge is sorting through a Group of that quality, the background is secondary to your concentration on the job at hand.

5. Breed judging was live-streamed each day, and Groups were featured live on Fox Sports. How important is this kind of coverage to purebred dogs? 

I think the coverage was very good for our Sport. I haven’t viewed any of the live-streamed Breed judging, but the Groups were handled well considering the time constraints. Judging for live television is not what most of us are used to and we all needed to make some adjustments to our regular routine. In some cases, this leads to criticism from the “armchair athletes.”

6. Let’s talk about those dogs! How challenging was the assignment? Can you share your selection process? 

It’s always easier to judge a group of good dogs than a group of mediocre dogs. Thanks to the breed judges, my job was much easier than it could have been. Sorting for type, then soundness, was not a problem at all. I had a number of dogs that, on first glance, I thought would be in the running only to have them fail on the down and back. My final cut of eight were all of correct breed type for me and all with sound and efficient movement.

7. Do you have a word or two about your winner? About the dogs that placed? 

I was pleased to see all four of my placements were bitches. All were unquestionably feminine, typical, and sound. The Shorthair bitch had the ring presence it takes to win a Group this deep in quality. I find her correct in every way and would be hard-pressed to change her.

8. In your opinion, does this year’s show reflect positively on the sport of dogs and on preservation breeders?

Absolutely. To have so many breeder/owner-handled dogs winning and or placing in their respective Groups and, ultimately, David winning Best after his lifetime of dedication to his breed displayed the commitment shared by so many in the sport.

9. Would you like to share a few words with the members of the Westminster Kennel Club?

Thank you, thank you, thank you. I can’t imagine the time and dedication involved in putting on this event. David Haddock, Dave Helming, Chat Reynders, and Paul Campanella left nothing to chance and their task was most certainly the challenge of a lifetime. And I cannot fail to mention that behind all these great men stands an amazingly efficient and talented woman in Florence Foti. I think Florence is likely the glue that holds everything in place. Thank you, Florence.

10. Have you got any advice to offer next year’s Group & BIS judges? 

Go prepared. Then have the time of your life. You will never forget it.

WKC SPORTING GROUP

G1 GCHS Clarity Reach The Sky Vjk-Myst
(German Shorthaired Pointer)

G2 GCHB Hope’s Copper Pennie
(Brittany)

G3 GCHS Sevenoaks Weymouthcatchingifre
(English Setter)

G4 GCH Greyborn’s Belle Starr
(Weimaraner)

Jamie Hubbard

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group Judges1. The past year has been unlike anything the (dog show) world has experienced. How did you spend your time preparing for this year’s assignment? 

I didn’t do anything different from previous years, although Doug and I went down to Manhattan Friday night and didn’t return back to Tarrytown until Saturday afternoon. It was a good way to keep my mind off the judging assignment until just a few hours before I entered the ring.

2. The show was not held in New York City for the first time in the club’s 145-year history. What are your thoughts about the Lyndhurst location? 

Lyndhurst was spectacular, but honestly it was the hard-working members of the WKC that brought it to life. I did attend the breed judging on Sunday and it was nice to see all the rings in one place. It made it easier to view the breeds you wanted to see.

3. Since the Groups were not judged at Madison Square Garden this year, did the night “feel” different to you in any way?

As a first-time Group judge, this is hard to answer. I can tell you from this year’s experience that once you get in the ring, you really tune out to what is going on around you.

4. What about the lack of spectators; did you miss the raucous New York crowd?

 See the answer to Question 3.

5. Breed judging was live-streamed each day, and Groups were featured live on Fox Sports. How important is this kind of coverage to purebred dogs?

There is no question that the coverage on Fox Sports reaches a large audience. I will also say that the announcers, Chris, Gail, and Donald, do a fabulous job promoting purebred dogs throughout their commentary. This alone is an added bonus to the coverage.

6. Let’s talk about those dogs! How challenging was the assignment? Can you share your selection process? 

The most important part of the judging process was to judge each dog against its own standard. It’s so easy to find an average dog of a popular breed, but to understand the nuances of the rare breeds is one that some people find difficult. After examining each individual dog, I realized that I had a number of those rare breeds that were excellent examples of their breeds. Thus, the reason you saw the Bluetick Coonhound, Redbone Coonhound, and Harrier in the placements.

7. Do you have a word or two about your winner? About the dogs that placed? 

Bottom line is that each of the four winners in my Hound Group were beautiful examples of their breed and showed off every aspect of their breed characteristics to the fullest.

8. In your opinion, does this year’s show reflect positively on the sport of dogs and on preservation breeders? 

Yes, it sure did. So many winners were either owner-handled or breeder/owner-handled. It demonstrated each of their handler’s dedication to their breeds.

9. Would you like to share a few words with the members of the Westminster Kennel Club?

Only just a few? Well, this event in our unique times was so well done that each WKC member deserves a Medal of Honor. Faced with a monumental task, they pulled it off like never before.

10. Have you got any advice to offer next year’s Group & BIS judges? 

The key words from the WKC and Fox Sports team is to be “deliberate” and “decisive,” since you are on live TV. Just go in and judge them like normal, but with these two words in mind… and enjoy yourself.

WKC HOUND GROUP

G1 GCHP Pinnacle Kentucky Bourbon
(Whippet)

G2 GCHG Evenstar-Wesridge’s One Hail Of A Man
(Bluetick Coonhound)

G3 GCHG My She Dances Like Uma Thurman
(Redbone Coonhound)

G4 GCHS Blythmoor Sheez-Beez Tell Me No Tales
(Harrier)

Judy Harrington

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group Judges1. The past year has been unlike anything the (dog show) world has experienced. How did you spend your time preparing for this year’s assignment? 

Not the way I had envisioned when I received the invitation! I tripped over a cinderblock in my garage in late November, and had surgery early December to put my kneecap back together. (I’m very careful and pay
better attention to where I’m headed now!) My preparation was a great surgeon and physical therapist, and who knew moving from February to June would work so perfectly for ME!

2. The show was not held in New York City for the first time in the club’s 145-year history. What are your thoughts about the Lyndhurst location?

Interestingly, very much like “going home” for me since my foundation breed was Great Danes and Lyndhurst was the site of the Great Dane Club of America National and Futurity for many years—and I judged my first AKC show there, the National Futurity.

For this year, the Lyndhurst site was just perfect and the weather was most cooperative for the judging in outdoor rings. The site is magnificent. It certainly was a great success and a perfect decision for “the show to go on!”

3. Since the Groups were not judged at Madison Square Garden this year, did the night “feel” different to you in any way? 

I must say that the invitation to judge WKC at Madison Square Garden is an amazing feeling. That said, this Westminster KC was a historic show; a year never to be forgotten, an amazing site, and I wouldn’t ever now trade this year for any other year or place. It was unique, unforgettable, and wonderful, and it was certainly a product of much planning and work that I still can’t imagine. It totally felt like Westminster Kennel Club!

4. What about the lack of spectators; did you miss the raucous New York crowd?

I must say that I didn’t really notice or focus on anything but the dogs, once I’d walked into the Group ring. Even at Madison Square Garden, as a handler on that floor, much of the crowd noise stays above you and isn’t as noticeable as you
would think.

5. Breed judging was live-streamed each day, and Groups were featured live on Fox Sports. How important is this kind of coverage to purebred dogs?

I believe it is very important, especially this year with limited access to the show. The public must know that, as Pat said, all show dogs are pets. Being able to see and learn about breeds, when intelligently discussed, has great value in those looking to add a dog to their household. Marketing is a double-edged sword these days, so the public needs access to good, understandable information. When I hear the term “rescue” and it’s a dog shipped up in a van from another part of the country for $$$, it is like a nail on a chalkboard. People DO think they are rescuing.

6. Let’s talk about those dogs! How challenging was the assignment? Can you share your selection process? 

The Group was the finest Working Group I have judged, and the majority in that Group could respectably be standing in first place at any all-breed show. Hands-on, there was correctness in size, type, soundness, details, thick ear leather where it should be, correct coat texture, bone and substance, and eye color.

In the end, there are only four ribbons to be awarded, and that evening I was so pleased to have the cut of quality and the four that I placed to remember for a lifetime.

7. Do you have a word or two about your winner? About the dogs that placed? 

The Samoyed I had early on in his career; a beautiful example of the breed in every way and presented perfectly. He was shown at an easy gait and not raced, handled on a loose lead, and got into his collar beautifully. I had never had the Doberman, and again, a beautiful representative of her breed in type and soundness. The Dane I had given a specialty to a couple of years ago, and I find her to be an outstanding example of the Great Dane in size, soundness, and temperament; with her size she is still feminine, with substance. The Pyr was equally correct in substance and head type for his breed, a sound mover, and again, shown at an easy gait.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that the Great Dane was breeder/owner-handled. I think it is important for exhibitors to know that, with quality, you are competitive.

8. In your opinion, does this year’s show reflect positively on the sport of dogs and on preservation breeders? 

YES, INDEED!

9. Would you like to share a few words with the members of the Westminster Kennel Club? 

What an amazing effort to bring this show to Lyndhurst in the style that was certainly befitting the Gilded Age: From the Governor’s Dinner, Judges Lunches… and that show building!… to the outdoor rings, video, TV, the location overlooking the Hudson River, and tours available at the estate.

There just aren’t enough words to thank the co-chairs and members of the Westminster Kennel Club, and Florence, for the invitation and experience of this once-in-a-lifetime event. Well Done!

10. Have you got any advice to offer next year’s Group & BIS judges? 

My first bit of advice would be to thoroughly enjoy the experience. My second bit of advice would be to find out where your breaks are, how long the breaks are in seconds, and where the dogs should be during the announcement of the breed in your judging procedure.

As for the red light/green light: Since most judges I know aren’t TV savvy as far as commercial breaks go, the idea that you need to be “on” and “off” is a bit unnerving. But once I watched the first night and realized the system, it’s a piece of cake! ENJOY!

WKC WORKING GROUP

G1 GCHG Vanderbilt ‘N Printemp’s Lucky Strike
(Samoyed)

G2 GCHP Protocols I Came I Saw I Sparkled CA
(Doberman Pinscher)

G3 GCHG Landmark-Divine Acres Kiss Myself, I’m So Pretty
(Great Dane)

G4 GCH Rivergroves Just In Time
(Great Pyrenees)

Bill Potter

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group Judges1. The past year has been unlike anything the (dog show) world has experienced. How did you spend your time preparing for this year’s assignment? 

Receiving the invitation to judge the Terrier Group at this year’s Westminster was beyond my wildest dream. As the pandemic hit, and event after event was canceled, I became worried that this Westminster would also be canceled. When I received the news that it would not be canceled, but delayed and held in a new venue, I was incredibly happy. I started reading about Lyndhurst and reviewing all the news I could gather on each change in COVID-19 protocols. The wait from February to June seemed longer than I thought it would. I did not change my normal routine of reviewing my collection of information and standards for each of the breeds to be shown to me. I just had extra time to continually repeat the process.

2. The show was not held in New York City for the first time in the club’s 145-year history. What are your thoughts about the Lyndhurst location?

Lyndhurst is a beautiful estate. Westminster Kennel Club’s accommodations built on the estate made for an ideal show grounds that was truly phenomenal!

3. Since the Groups were not judged at Madison Square Garden this year, did the night “feel” different to you in any way? 

I have never seen anything like the tent structure that was built for the Groups and BIS. It was amazing. The show surface was the same size as Madison Square Garden, which allowed for the Group judging process to remain unchanged. It felt more intimate. There was less crowd noise, and the dogs were more comfortable with it.

4. What about the lack of spectators; did you miss the raucous New York crowd? 

I missed the activity and the events that normally accompany the Westminster Kennel Club show in New York City, but the crowd at the show—I did not miss. Although the fact that the venue precluded the show being benched, without spectators, did impact the “feel” of the show in general. Given our new reality created by the pandemic; that change was an easy sacrifice for the ability to hold the show.

5. Breed Judging was live-streamed each day, and Groups were featured live on Fox Sports. How important is this kind of coverage to purebred dogs? 

Any, and all, exposure to the world of purebred dogs is a positive for our sport. The ability of the general public to view the Westminster Kennel Club show being streamed, and more importantly, broadcasted live, was a one-of-a-kind experience. It provided exposure to each of the breeds being exhibited, and viewing of the full process of Breed, Group, and BIS judging.

6. Let’s talk about those dogs! How challenging was the assignment? Can you share your selection process?

Judging a Group at Westminster Kennel Club show is different than at most shows. There is nothing like the anticipation of standing at the judges’ table waiting for the Group to be announced, to get a first look at the dogs that were awarded Best of Breed. The time constraints
associated with live broadcasting was taken into consideration, but my selection process did not change from any other Group assignment. As I went over each exhibit, I created a ranking of the dogs examined. I made a short list for further consideration. The quality of the dogs at this show raised a special challenge. Almost every entry was exceptional. It was difficult to exclude some breeds from my “cut.” It was even more difficult to exclude from placings any of those kept for final consideration.

7. Do you have a word or two about your winner? About the dogs that placed? 

My winner, the West Highland White Terrier, GCHG Crystal Boy De Pomme, is exceptional. He is a right-sized, shapely example of his breed. He has a lovely broad head, properly carried ears, and dark almond-shaped eyes. His compact body is of correct shape, with a broad, strong loin. He is wonderfully angulated, both front and rear. He moves like a dream. His physical attributes were enhanced by his showmanship with a
“look at me” attitude.

Second was the beautiful Miniature Schnauzer bitch, GCHP Carmel Sky High Wish Upon A Star. She truly is a smaller version of a Standard Schnauzer in her proportions, angulation, and carriage. She is everything one could ask for in a Miniature Schnauzer bitch. She is strongly built, but at the same time feminine. Her movement is strong and true.

Third was the Border bitch, GCHG Meadowlake High Times. She has the most beautiful Border Terrier bitch head that I think I have ever seen. It is feminine, and at the same time, correctly “otter-shaped.” She is of correct size and proportions, and moves freely, with good reach and drive.

Fourth was the Wire Fox Terrier dog, GCH Random Real Quiet. He is a correctly proportioned young dog who holds his shape whether standing or moving. He is a young stallion whom I think will only get better with age. He moves cleanly, propelled by the strong drive of his correct rear assembly.

8. In your opinion, does this year’s show reflect positively on the sport of dogs and on preservation of breeders? 

Yes. To the general public, the entire event was a demonstration that we are breeders of physically and mentally healthy, well cared for, and well-trained canines. To the participants in the world of dog breeding and shows, it was a celebration of the successes that we have had in advancing the lines of the breeds we have chosen.

9. Would you like to share a few words with the members of the Westminster Kennel Club? 

I praise the accomplishments of the Show Chairs, David Haddock and David Helming, the Show Committee, officers, members, and staff of Westminster Kennel Club in pulling off this wonderful event under trying circumstances. Every detail was planned and perfectly executed. I believe that all of us in the sport of purebred dogs owe them a hardy thank you for the public relations boost this year’s show had for all who participated in, or watched, any of it.

10. Have you got any advice to offer next year’s Group & BIS judges? 

Relax and enjoy the experience!

WKC TERRIER GROUP

G1 GCHG Crystal Boy De La Pomme
(West Highland White Terrier)

G2 GCHP Carmel Sky High Wish Upon A Star
(Miniature Schnauzer)

G3 GCHG Meadowlake High Times
(Border Terrier)

G4 GCH Random Real Quiet
(Wire Fox Terrier)

June Penta

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group JudgesMy first breed was Afghan Hounds, soon followed by Shih Tzu, which I bred and exhibited under the Spring Valley prefix in the 1960s and ‘70s, finishing a number of AKC Champions.

An AKC judge for forty-five years, I am approved to judge all Hound, Toy, and Herding breeds, and Best in Show. I have been selected to judge many regional and national specialty shows, including the Shih Tzu National a record seven times. This is my fourth Westminster assignment. I have also judged the Herding Group at the televised National Dog Show. Other notable assignments include the AKC National Championship Show and numerous foreign assignments.

I am a member of the American Dog Show Judges and the American Shih Tzu Club. My involvement in judges education extends over twenty-five years and includes the production of the renowned ADSJ Advanced Institute. I am also Secretary/Treasurer of the Dog Judges Educational Foundation.

I hold a BA and MEd in Art, and I taught art for 35 years in the public schools. I sit on the Board of Directors of the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra and I am a member of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art. I am married to Dr. Gerard C. Penta, a retired university professor and AKC multiple Group Judge

1. The past year has been unlike anything the (dog show) world has experienced. How did you spend your time preparing for this year’s assignment?

My preparation consisted of thoroughly reviewing the standards of the dogs in the Toy Group, and deciding what to wear.

2. The show was not held in New York City for the first time in the club’s 145-year history. What are your thoughts about the Lyndhurst location? 

The Lyndhurst Estate provided a sharp contrast to mid-town Manhattan. The mansion commands a lovely pastoral setting on the bank of the Hudson River, which seems a world away from the hustle and bustle of New York City.

3. Since the Groups were not judged at Madison Square Garden this year, did the night “feel” different to you in any way? 

The in-ring feel was familiar, thanks to the incredible work of the Westminster Kennel Club and Fox Sports. But once outside the great tent, the experience was very different.

4. What about the lack of spectators; did you miss the raucous New York crowd? 

To some extent, the large crowd was missed. However, there were spectators and an amount of cheering for the individual dogs, which contributed to the atmosphere of a dog show.

5. Breed judging was live-streamed each day, and Groups were featured live on Fox Sports. How important is this kind of coverage to purebred dogs?

Obviously, any time the dog show world can put its best foot forward, and by doing so capture the attention of the public, it is a great plus for the sport.

6. Let’s talk about those dogs! How challenging was the assignment? Can you share your selection process?

As a whole, the Toy Group was truly outstanding. The quality was so deep that it extended well beyond the cut. In other contexts, I would be very pleased to have some of the wonderful show dogs that had to
be excused.

7. Do you have a word or two about your winner? About the dogs that placed? 

Group One, GCHG Pequest Wasabi, has everything one could ask for in a Pekingese. From his envelope-shaped head with large, round, wide-set eyes to his heavy-fronted, pear-shaped, rectangular body, he was every bit the standard in form, rolling gait, and attitude. In all my many years of judging Pekingese, Wasabi is one of the very best examples of the breed that I have had the pleasure of judging.

My Group Two, GCHP Empee’s Cyber Monday, a lovely black Pomeranian, fit nicely into a circle and exhibited the cocky, animated attitude called for in the breed standard. His outstanding breed characteristics overcame the slight disadvantage that some solid black dogs have regarding expression. On close examination, his bright, foxy expression, with tiny, erect ears, dark eyes, and beautiful coat, contributed to this exquisite example of the breed.

Group Three went to the very impressive Havanese, GCHP Oeste’s in The Name Of Love. Proper topline, coat, springy movement, and overall conformation contribute to this typey, animated show dog. Both eye-catching in overall appearance and then satisfying as hands-on examination confirm the impression of a structurally correct Havanese.

All the right curves in all the right places typified my Group Four winner. The lovely GCHB Integra Maja Beach Please! was the only bitch among the Group Placements. This elegant Italian Greyhound’s free, high-stepping gait clearly distinguishes her from similar breeds. Having a mental picture of this lovely young lady would help any new Toy judge tasked with the job of sorting out a large class of IGs.

8. In your opinion, does this year’s show reflect positively on the sport of dogs and on preservation breeders? 

See answer from Question 5.

9. Would you like to share a few words with the members of the Westminster Kennel Club?

Only just a few? Congratulations on a job very well done under challenging circumstances. Thank you for a memorable experience.

10. Have you got any advice to offer next year’s Group & BIS judges?

Relax and enjoy the assignment.

WKC TOY GROUP

G1 GCHG Pequest Wasabi
(Pekingese)

G2 GCHP Empee’s Cyber Monday
(Pomeranian)

G3 GCHP Oeste’s In The Name Of Love
(Havanese)

G4 GCHB Integra Maja Beach Please!
(Italian Greyhound)

Dennis McCoy

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Group Judges1. The past year has been unlike anything the (dog show) world has experienced. How did you spend your time preparing for this year’s assignment? 

What a thrill when I received a phone call to judge the Non-Sporting Group at this year’s Westminster Kennel Club. While it was somewhat of a last-minute invitation as a result of a travel restriction cancellation, it was an honor of a lifetime. Having won this Group many times myself, to be on the judging side was going to be very exciting. Nothing about the exiting comment let me down for a minute.

2. The show was not held in New York City for the first time in the club’s 145-year history. What are your thoughts about the Lyndhurst location?

The show being held outdoors at the beautiful Lyndhurst Estate was in itself a real coup and a tremendous task taken on by the co-chairs, David Helming and David Haddock. My hat is off to them and the entire Westminster Kennel Club; what a job and so well executed. The behind-the-scenes work must have taken hours upon hours to transform the estate into the Westminster event that will never be forgotten. Florence Foti and staff orchestrated such precise detail in regards to every move that myself, as a judge, would do—from the moment I accepted the assignment until I arrived at the airport to fly home. The event was truly one to be remembered.

3. Since the Groups were not judged at Madison Square Garden this year, did the night “feel” different to you in any way? 

After a year with few dog shows, to open up the dog show world again with such class was amazing. The site turned magical; the tenting, the rings, the TV screens in the middle of the tents outside, coverage by Fox Sports, and then to walk into the huge indoor arena—right down to the lighting and the platform flooring was spectacular, to say the least. I cannot imagine the planning and work that had gone into the evening events.

4. What about the lack of spectators; did you miss the raucous New York crowd? 

Although the crowds were less, the excitement was of a different sort. Not knowing quite what to expect, the evening Group ring was a replica of the floor at Madison Square Garden, with subtle touches that made it part of the Lyndhurst Estate. It was the ambience of Westminster brought to life.

5. Breed judging was live-streamed each day, and Groups were featured live on Fox Sports. How important is this kind of coverage to purebred dogs? 

Fox Sports coverage was precise and great to work with.

6. Let’s talk about those dogs! How challenging was the assignment? Can you share your selection process?

I myself had not judged any Non-Sporting dogs in over a year, so walking into the Group ring I was filled with anticipation. Thank you, to all the Breed judges for sending me a lovely group of dogs.

7. Do you have a word or two about your winner? About the dogs that placed?

As I went over each dog and watched them move, they began to sort themselves out. In the end, the French Bulldog, with a square head, proper ears and expression, overall outline and movement, carrying the proper topline as he moved around the ring with a confident attitude, was my eventual winner of the night.

Second was the lovely Chinese Shar-Pei bitch, carrying herself properly, squarely built, with good expression and appropriate size. Third place was the Lhasa, with proper coat, correct outline, in beautiful condition and shown to perfection. Fourth place was the beautiful Schipperke bitch, with square profile and proper topline making a beautiful silhouette.

8. In your opinion, does this year’s show reflect positively on the sport of dogs and on preservation breeders? 

It was truly an honor to judge the Non-Sporting Group Saturday evening. I could only place four dogs and was pleased with my outcome. To all the breeders, owners, and handlers, I thank you for bringing such nice dogs to this great event, in spite of all the challenges we’ve endured throughout the COVID pandemic.

9. Would you like to share a few words with the members of the Westminster Kennel Club? 

To all the members of the Westminster Kennel Club, and President Charlton Reynders, III, you outdid yourselves; from the moment l arrived at the airport to the wonderful judges dinner held under the tent at the estate, and the entire set-up at the show. I cannot thank you enough for all the hospitality you provided.

 

WKC NON-SPORTING GROUP

G1 GCHP Chaselands Mathew Moss
(French Bulldog)

G2 GCHP Majesty Legaxy Asia’s Crown Jewel
(Chinese Shar-Pei)

G3 GCHB Xeralane’s Shut Up And Kiss Me
(Lhasa Apso)

G4 GCHB Delamer Suzi Sells Sushi On The Boardwalk
(Schipperke)

WKC HERDING GROUP

G1 GCH Bugaboo’s Courage Of Conviction
(Old English Sheepdog)

G2 GCH Cordmaker Punchinello
(Puli)

G3 GCHG Dynasty’s Epic Adventure At Sunpeak BCAT
(Miniature American Shepherd)

G4 GCHS Woodside’s Arabella
(German Shepherd Dog)

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